Sergei Trufanov was once a close associate of Grigori Rasputin, he broke sharply with him in 1911 for reasons that are not clear and started a slander and blackmail campaign against his former friend. He is known primarily for his work, semi-autobiographical, and biographical on Rasputin. In this work, he was supported by Maxim Gorky, who hoped that Trufanoff’s story on Rasputin would discredit Tsar’s family and eventually contribute to the revolutionary propaganda.
In 1912, Iliodor renounced Russian Orthodox Church, published an apology to Jews, and was defrocked. He emigrated from Russia to Norway in 1914. In 1918, he returned to Soviet Russia, offering his services to Lenin, and lived for several years in Tsaritsyn. In 1922, he was deported for anti-Soviet propagandizing, and spent most of the remainder of his life in New York City, where he became a Baptist.

Sergei Trufanov was once a close associate of Grigori Rasputin, he broke sharply with him in 1911 for reasons that are not clear and started a slander and blackmail campaign against his former friend. He is known primarily for his work, semi-autobiographical, and biographical on Rasputin. In this work, he was supported by Maxim Gorky, who hoped that Trufanoff’s story on Rasputin would discredit Tsar’s family and eventually contribute to the revolutionary propaganda.
In 1912, Iliodor renounced Russian Orthodox Church, published an apology to Jews, and was defrocked. He emigrated from Russia to Norway in 1914. In 1918, he returned to Soviet Russia, offering his services to Lenin, and lived for several years in Tsaritsyn. In 1922, he was deported for anti-Soviet propagandizing, and spent most of the remainder of his life in New York City, where he became a Baptist.