zsayyed:

By: Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

First painting entitles “Solange” i think.

Photos from “Stop Telling Women to Smile” 

Sculpture entitled “Is he Black enough for you?”

Last photo is the Roots Mural in Philadelphia in honor of The Roots

http://www.tlynnfaz.com

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Men try to pull a body from under the rubble at a site hit by what activists said was shelling by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo’s district of al-Sukari.

Men try to pull a body from under the rubble at a site hit by what activists said was shelling by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo’s district of al-Sukari.

Heretics Fork

This torture device consisted of a metal piece with two opposed bi-pronged forks attached to a belt or strap. One end of the device was pushed under the chin, the other to the sternum, and the strap was used to secure the victim’s neck to the tool while the victim hung from the ceiling or was somehow suspended so that they could not sleep. If their heads dropped, the prongs would pierce their throat and chest.

Heretics Fork

This torture device consisted of a metal piece with two opposed bi-pronged forks attached to a belt or strap. One end of the device was pushed under the chin, the other to the sternum, and the strap was used to secure the victim’s neck to the tool while the victim hung from the ceiling or was somehow suspended so that they could not sleep. If their heads dropped, the prongs would pierce their throat and chest.

nok-ind:

The Yoruba Orisha Part 2 (Part 1) 

An Orisha (also spelled Orisa or Orixa) is a spirit or deity that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba religious system. (Olodumare is also known by various other names includ
ing Olorun, Eledumare, Eleda and 

Olofin-Orun). This religion has found its way throughout the world and is now expressed in practices as varied as Candomblé, Lucumí/Santería, Shango in Trinidad, Anago and Oyotunji, as well as in some aspects of Umbanda, Winti, Obeah, Vodun and a host of others.

These varieties or spiritual lineages are practiced throughout areas of Nigeria, the Republic of Benin, Togo, Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela among others. As interest in Yoruba religion system grows, Orisha communities and lineages can be found in parts of Europe and Asia as well. While estimates may vary, some scholars believe that there could be more than 150 million adherents of this spiritual tradition worldwide.
(Please note some of the Orisha have male/female personifications)
 

Do not remove the original comments.

nok-ind:

The Yoruba Orisha Part 1 (Part 2)

An Orisha (also spelled Orisa or Orixa) is a spirit or deity that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba religious system. (Olodumare is also known by various other names includ
ing Olorun, Eledumare, Eleda and 

Olofin-Orun). This religion has found its way throughout the world and is now expressed in practices as varied as Candomblé, Lucumí/Santería, Shango in Trinidad, Anago and Oyotunji, as well as in some aspects of Umbanda, Winti, Obeah, Vodun and a host of others.

These varieties or spiritual lineages are practiced throughout areas of Nigeria, the Republic of Benin, Togo, Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela among others. As interest in Yoruba religion system grows, Orisha communities and lineages can be found in parts of Europe and Asia as well. While estimates may vary, some scholars believe that there could be more than 150 million adherents of this spiritual tradition worldwide.

(Please note many Orisha have male/female personifications)

Click here for a Brief understanding. 

Courtesy: James C. Lewis (http://www.noire3000studios.com/)

Do not remove the original comments.

okjanelle:

“Where there is a woman there is magic.” ― Ntozake Shange

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

unaguerrasinfondo:

Lucecita (Luz Esther Benítez) - musician and activist.
Lucecita was blacklisted from Puerto Rican television during the early 1970s for her refusal to whiten her appearance and for her support of revolutionary movements in Puerto Rico and Cuba (many Puerto Rican television stations were owned and staffed primarily by white cuban exiles). In response to the harsh criticism she drew due to her adoption of what was referred to by the Puerto Rican press as ‘the African look’, Lucecita released songs that rejected eurocentrism and celebrated the African heritage of Puerto Rico. She also transgressed gendered boundaries by performing in ‘masculine’ outfits, such as suits and tuxedos, which were traditionally never worn by women on stage. In addition to her outfits, Lucecita often used masculine adjectives in her songs and interviews, sometimes interchanging between masculine and feminine. The catholic church and homophobia were also targets of Lucecita, both of which she openly criticized throughout the 1970s. 

unaguerrasinfondo:

Lucecita (Luz Esther Benítez) - musician and activist.

Lucecita was blacklisted from Puerto Rican television during the early 1970s for her refusal to whiten her appearance and for her support of revolutionary movements in Puerto Rico and Cuba (many Puerto Rican television stations were owned and staffed primarily by white cuban exiles). In response to the harsh criticism she drew due to her adoption of what was referred to by the Puerto Rican press as ‘the African look’, Lucecita released songs that rejected eurocentrism and celebrated the African heritage of Puerto Rico. She also transgressed gendered boundaries by performing in ‘masculine’ outfits, such as suits and tuxedos, which were traditionally never worn by women on stage. In addition to her outfits, Lucecita often used masculine adjectives in her songs and interviews, sometimes interchanging between masculine and feminine. The catholic church and homophobia were also targets of Lucecita, both of which she openly criticized throughout the 1970s. 

(via casaatabexache)

Simply put, the titanus giganteus is the largest beetle in the world (and we don’t mean Paul McCartney). The beetle is said to be larger than some small adult Chihuahuas, and the largest recorded specimen was measured in at 6.6 inches long.

Despite their gargantuan size, large jaws of death, incredibly sharp spines and their ability to fly, the titan is actually quite harmless to humans. They live in seclusion in some of the world’s hottest tropical jungles, including French Guiana and Brazil, and are often found recycling decaying wood below the earth’s surface. 

Like most inhabitants of the rainforest, the beetle is primarily threatened by the destruction of its home due to timber and agriculture expositions and has seen its population decrease over the past few years. They take years to mature and grow to their full size, and when the adults finally emerge, they seek out a mate during the hottest time of year and die shortly after in just a few weeks. Their larvae on the other hand have never been found but are thought to feed inside wood as part of their growing cycle.

Simply put, the titanus giganteus is the largest beetle in the world (and we don’t mean Paul McCartney). The beetle is said to be larger than some small adult Chihuahuas, and the largest recorded specimen was measured in at 6.6 inches long.

Despite their gargantuan size, large jaws of death, incredibly sharp spines and their ability to fly, the titan is actually quite harmless to humans. They live in seclusion in some of the world’s hottest tropical jungles, including French Guiana and Brazil, and are often found recycling decaying wood below the earth’s surface.

Like most inhabitants of the rainforest, the beetle is primarily threatened by the destruction of its home due to timber and agriculture expositions and has seen its population decrease over the past few years. They take years to mature and grow to their full size, and when the adults finally emerge, they seek out a mate during the hottest time of year and die shortly after in just a few weeks. Their larvae on the other hand have never been found but are thought to feed inside wood as part of their growing cycle.

In 1995, the body of an almost entirely frozen young Inca girl, later named Mummy Juanita, was discovered on Mount Ampato. Two more ice-preserved mummies, one girl and one boy, were discovered nearby a short while later. All showed signs of death by a blow to the head. Juanita was killed as an offering to the Inca gods sometime between 1450 and 1480, she was approximately 11–15 years old.

Judging from the condition of the body, it is believed that she was drugged and left to die in the mountains. It would not have taken much time for her to die due to the high exposure. The Incan high priests took their victims to high mountaintops for sacrifice. As the journey was extremely long and arduous, especially so for the younger victims, coca leaves were fed to them to aid them in their breathing so as to allow them to reach the burial site alive. Upon reaching the burial site, the children were given an intoxicating drink to minimize pain, fear, and resistance, then killed them either by strangulation, a blow to their head or by leaving them to lose consciousness in the extreme cold and die of exposure. She is the best-preserved mummy ever found, with internal organs intact, blood still present in the heart and lungs, and skin and facial features mostly unscathed. No special effort had been made to preserve her and 500 years later still looked like sleeping children.

Many Inca children were offered as sacrifice during or after important events, such as the death of the Sapa Inca (who was the emperor) or during a famine. These sacrifices were known as capacocha.

Dr Julius Neubronner’s Miniature Pigeon Camera

In 1908 Dr Julius Neubronner patented a miniature pigeon camera activated by a timing mechanism. The invention brought him international notability after he presented it at international expositions in Dresden, Frankfurt and Paris in 1909–1911. Spectators in Dresden could watch the arrival of the camera-equipped carrier pigeons, and the photos were immediately developed and turned into postcards which could be purchased.

Founder of a free school for slum children Rajesh Kumar Sharma, second from right, and Laxmi Chandra, right, write on black boards, painted on a building wall, at a free school run under a metro bridge in New Delhi, India. At least 30 children living in the nearby slums have been receiving free education from this school for the last three years.

In 1966, when David Reimer was 8 months old, his circumcision was botched and he lost his penis to burns. Psychologist John Money suggested that baby David be given a sex change. The parents agreed, but what they didn’t know was that Money secretly wanted to use David as part of an experiment to prove his views that gender identity was not inborn, but rather determined by nature and upbringing. David was renamed Brenda, surgically altered to have a vagina, and given hormonal supplements — but tragically the experiment backfired. “Brenda” acted like a stereotypical boy throughout childhood, and the Reimer family began to fall apart. At 14, Brenda was told the truth, and decided to go back to being David. He committed suicide at the age of 38.

In 1966, when David Reimer was 8 months old, his circumcision was botched and he lost his penis to burns. Psychologist John Money suggested that baby David be given a sex change. The parents agreed, but what they didn’t know was that Money secretly wanted to use David as part of an experiment to prove his views that gender identity was not inborn, but rather determined by nature and upbringing. David was renamed Brenda, surgically altered to have a vagina, and given hormonal supplements — but tragically the experiment backfired. “Brenda” acted like a stereotypical boy throughout childhood, and the Reimer family began to fall apart. At 14, Brenda was told the truth, and decided to go back to being David. He committed suicide at the age of 38.

Running along a similar theme similar to the Milgram experiment, The Third Wave, carried out in 1967, was an experiment that set out to explore the ways in which even democratic societies can become infiltrated by the appeal of fascism. Using a class of high school students, the experimenter created a system whereby some students were considered members of a prestigious order. The students showed increased motivation to learn, yet, more worryingly, became eager to get on board with malevolent practices, such as excluding and ostracizing non-members from the class. Even more scarily, this behavior was gleefully continued outside of the classroom. After just four days, the experiment was considered to be slipping out of control and was ceased.

Running along a similar theme similar to the Milgram experiment, The Third Wave, carried out in 1967, was an experiment that set out to explore the ways in which even democratic societies can become infiltrated by the appeal of fascism. Using a class of high school students, the experimenter created a system whereby some students were considered members of a prestigious order. The students showed increased motivation to learn, yet, more worryingly, became eager to get on board with malevolent practices, such as excluding and ostracizing non-members from the class. Even more scarily, this behavior was gleefully continued outside of the classroom. After just four days, the experiment was considered to be slipping out of control and was ceased.

In 1963, in the wake of the atrocities of the Holocaust, Stanley Milgram set out to test the hypothesis that there was something special about the German people that had allowed them to participate in genocide. Under the pretense of an experiment into human learning, Milgram asked normal members of the public to ask questions to a man attached to an electric-shock generator and shock him in increasing measure when he answered incorrectly. The man was an actor, the shocks fake; but the participants didn’t know this. The terrifying part? People overwhelmingly obeyed the commands of the experimenter, even when the man screamed in apparent agony and begged for mercy. A little evil in all of us, perhaps? 

(Photo of The Milgram Experiment taking place)

In 1963, in the wake of the atrocities of the Holocaust, Stanley Milgram set out to test the hypothesis that there was something special about the German people that had allowed them to participate in genocide. Under the pretense of an experiment into human learning, Milgram asked normal members of the public to ask questions to a man attached to an electric-shock generator and shock him in increasing measure when he answered incorrectly. The man was an actor, the shocks fake; but the participants didn’t know this. The terrifying part? People overwhelmingly obeyed the commands of the experimenter, even when the man screamed in apparent agony and begged for mercy. A little evil in all of us, perhaps?

(Photo of The Milgram Experiment taking place)

In this study, conducted in 1939, 22 orphaned children, 10 with stutters, were separated equally into two groups: one with a speech therapist who conducted “positive” therapy by praising the children’s progress and fluency of speech; the other with a speech therapist who openly chastised the children for the slightest mistake. The results showed that the children who had received negative responses were badly affected in terms of their psychological health. Yet more bad news was to come as it was later revealed that some of the children who had previously been unaffected developed speech problems following the experiment. In 2007, six of the orphan children were awarded $925,000 in compensation for emotional damage that the six-month-study had left them with.

(Photo of Wendell Johnson, of the University of Iowa, who was behind the study)

In this study, conducted in 1939, 22 orphaned children, 10 with stutters, were separated equally into two groups: one with a speech therapist who conducted “positive” therapy by praising the children’s progress and fluency of speech; the other with a speech therapist who openly chastised the children for the slightest mistake. The results showed that the children who had received negative responses were badly affected in terms of their psychological health. Yet more bad news was to come as it was later revealed that some of the children who had previously been unaffected developed speech problems following the experiment. In 2007, six of the orphan children were awarded $925,000 in compensation for emotional damage that the six-month-study had left them with.

(Photo of Wendell Johnson, of the University of Iowa, who was behind the study)